Arctic ‘Trash Animals’: New paper on multi-species waste relations in Environmental Humanities

A new paper on Arctic ‘trash animals’, entitled ‘Raven, Dog, Human: Inhuman Colonialism and Unsettling Cosmologies’ (Zahara and Hird 2015) has been published in the latest issue of the journal Environmental Humanities. In the paper, Dr. Myra J. Hird and I argue that particular understandings of humans/nature are bequeathed to future generations along with waste. By analyzing the historical and contemporary relationships between Inuit/Qallunaat/ravens/ and sled dogs, we argue that both settler ontologies and waste work to materially re-configure relationships between humans and the inhuman.

Animal bones in an abandoned military dump outside of Iqaluit, Nunavut. Photo by Alexander Zahara, 2014.
Animal bones in an abandoned military dump outside of Iqaluit, Nunavut. Photo by Alexander Zahara, 2014.

The paper is part of a special issue on Inheriting the Ecological Legacies of Settler colonialism, edited by Affrica Taylor, Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw, Sandrina de Finney, and Mindy Blaise– members of the Common World Research Collective.

The latest issue of Environmental Humanities also includes a paper on nuclear waste landscapes in the United States  by Shannon Cram (2015) and a special commentary section on the ‘Ecomodernest Manifesto’ by Bruno Latour and others.

Full Citations:

Zahara, A.R.D. and M.J. Hird. (2015) ‘Raven, Dog, Human: Inhuman Colonialism and Unsettling Cosmologies’. Environmental Humanities 7: 169-190.

Cram, S. (2015) ‘Wild and Scenic Wasteland: Conservation Politics in the Nuclear Wilderness’. Environmental Humanities 7: 89-105.

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